Gallery

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This little guy's dream is to be a Doctor when he grows up.
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They need a new kitchen!!! - it's tiny!! and it's smoky
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The toilet "facilities" 
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Some of the girls, loving the hats that were brought for the smaller children.

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Can you imagine a child doing this? A frisbee for eating the main meal of the day
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The faces, sad, happy,
 - all in need.
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New Generation Children's Center is one of the places where I go to help the children with school and classroom supplies as well as water bottles and a limited number of toys. It's not far from our lodging and it's also place where we get water from the stream. It's still has to be cleaned and purified but it's better then the water from a regular faucet

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I met Upendo and Edward at the second orphanage I worked with in Moshi, Africa and have been with me for more than 10 years.   They come and spend time with me every couple days while I'm there in the country. I am able to bring clothes for each of them - usually head to toe!  Here I also brought them briefcases from an organization to which I belong. 

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This is a favorite picture because of the smiles it creates. Think about it. We tip the wait staff and we hardly ever think of the kitchen staff. They are the ones who prepare our meals. Without them, the waitstaff would have nothing to serve. Like most, we just put a tip in the general box - to be split among AlLL the staff. My guys, Juma and Elia - on either side of me, talked to me about it . . . such a wake up call!  The following year, I brought every one of them new shirts and each received a hat from Ariix, the company I work with.  ust look at their smiles. They told me not even ONE person had give them a personal “gratuity”. 

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Hundreds of children got frisbees so they could be distributed many classrooms and used in the playground. 

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Once I found out there was a Nelson Mandela school in Moshi, Tanzania, Africa, I wanted to teach there. I knew the information I had about water and plastic would be important for the students to learn.  Juma Jigwa (pictured at left) and Elia Amosi ((pictured at right),  my two “sons” I had “adopted” almost from the beginning of my yearly trips to Africa in 2010, turned that from possibility to reality. Juma reached out to Peggy, principal of the school, and made it happen. The two young children were the first ones to receive their free (to them) Puritii bottles.


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The children gather around while I teach them to stitch.

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Richard and Joseph are 2 young men I adore and I met them at theKilimanjaro Orphanage Center when they were about 8 or 9 years old and here they're already teenagers.  I taught, worked and played with them . . .  and watch them grow


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It sometimes pays to be the oldest in the school - this was the first class to all receive a Puritii water filtration system. Considering some of them had to walk miles to and from school every day, this was a real blessing. They could easily fill their bottles at any water source because the filter removes everything except salt. 

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IT IS ALWAYS HARD TO SAY GOODBYE